Posts tagged Male
Ansel Adams

Ansel Easton Adams was known for his black and white photographs of the California's Yosemite Valley. Adams was also the author of numerous books about photography, including his trilogy of technical instruction manuals (The Camera, The Negative, and The Print). He co-founded the photographic association Group f/64 along with other masters like Edward Weston, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and others. He invented the zone system, a technique which allows photographers to translate the light they see into specific densities on negatives and paper, thus giving them better control over finished photographs. Adams also pioneered the idea of visualization (which he often called 'previsualization', though he later acknowledged that term to be a redundancy) of the finished print based upon the measured light values in the scene being photographed.

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Eugène Atget

The work of Eugène Atget is one of the richest pictorial embodiments of French culture. Working as a photographer mainly in and near Paris from the late 1890s until his death in 1927, Atget made a total of about 10,000 individual images. Over the course of his long career he discovered and progressively mastered photography’s capacity to transform plain fact into visual poetry. In the rapid unfolding of modernist photography in the late 1920s and early 1930s, Atget’s work soon became the exemplar of the medium’s new creative power. No major photographer in the half-century following his death was untouched by Atget’s influence. At his death in 1927, the French government purchased a portion of Atget’s negatives; the remaining contents of his studio and greater body of his work were purchased by photographer Berenice Abbott and art dealer Julian Levy. Carefully looked after by Abbott, the collection was later sold to the Museum of Modern Art.

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Morley Baer

After briefly considering a career in journalism, Morley Baer began his artistic career as a landscape and architectural photographer. Having seen an Edward Weston exhibition in Chicago, Baer’s mind was made up; he was California-bound to pursue photography and to meet Weston himself. Following naval service during WWII, Baer returned to Carmel once again, where Weston was still living. A close friendship was formed between the two photographers over these years. Baer’s work elicits a kind of intimate pleasure, evoking in many a sense of familiarity with what may often be an unknown land. Morley Baer represents a generation of photographers whose aesthetic interest in the landscape was inseparable from their love of the land itself.

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John Baldessari

John Anthony Baldessari is an American conceptual artist known for his work featuring found photography and appropriated images. He lives and works in Santa Monica, California. Initially a painter, Baldessari began to incorporate texts and photography into his canvases in the mid-1960s. In 1970 he began working in printmaking, film, video, installation, sculpture and photography. He has created thousands of works that demonstrate - and, in many cases, combine - the narrative potential of images and the associative power of language within the boundaries of the work of art. His art has been featured in more than 200 solo exhibitions in the U.S. and Europe.

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Édouard Baldus

Édouard Baldus was born in 1820 in France and worked as a painter in the 1840s photography peeked his interest. He was a founding member of the Societe Heliographique and an important influence to the art of heliogravure, a photomechanical process. He used the calotype process from 1851 and began using collodion wet-plate negatives and albumen prints in 1956. A pioneer of the photographic medium, he documented architectureal monuments of France as well as landscpes, paintings and the documentation of the Rhone Floods. In 1851 he was commissioned by the Comite des Monuments Historiques to photograph monuments in Paris, Fontainebleau, Burgundy, the Dauphine, Normandy, Auvergne and Provence. During 1854-1855 Baldus created 1,500 photographs of a new wing of the Louvre in Paris and was commissioned by Baron James de Rothschild to photograph the railroad lines in France.

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Jeffrey Becom

In his photography, Jeffrey Becom combines an architect’s love of geometry, pattern and texture with a painter’s sensitivity to color, light, and composition. He spent a decade creating his series of photographs on the Mediterranean, collected in the book Mediterranean Color with Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Paul Goldberger. Becom then began photographing throughout Mexico and Central America, documenting the traditions of the living Maya in his book Maya Color. Having recently voyaged to India, Becom’s latest work depicts the beauty and power of the colorful traditions of Indian architecture. His extraordinarily vivid images are also a testimony to his eye for form and composition. His photographs are represented in public and private collections throughout the world.

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Édouard Boubat

Boubat was born in Montmartre, Paris. He studied typography and graphic arts at the École Estienne and worked for a printing company before becoming a photographer. In 1943 he was subjected to service du travail obligatoire, forced labour of French people in Nazi Germany, and witnessed the horrors of World War II. He took his first photograph after the war in 1946 and was awarded the Kodak Prize the following year. He travelled the world for the French magazine Réalités, where his colleague was Jean-Philippe Charbonnier, and later worked as a freelance photographer. French poet Jacques Prévert called him a "peace correspondent" as he was humanist, apolitical and photographed uplifting subjects. His son Bernard Boubat is also a photographer.

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Bill Brandt

Having apprenticed to Man Ray, Brandt originally began his career working as a photojournalist on assignment. His photography was a singular and idiosyncratic mixture of straight reportage with a consistent, if subtle, streak of strangeness - the legacy of surrealism. He would eventually turn from “straight” photography, so dominant in the post-war culture of the time, towards abstracted images in which figures were distorted or wide-angle lenses used. Highly respected for the intensity and power of his images, Brandt is considered one of the preeminent photographers to have emerged in England.

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Manuel Álvarez Bravo

Manuel Alvarez Bravo was one of the founders of modern photography and considered the main representative of Latin American photography in the 20th century. His work extends from the late 1920s to the 1990s. Álvarez Bravo was born in downtown Mexico City on February 4, 1902. He left school at the age of twelve in order to begin making a contribution to his family’s finances after his father's death. He worked at a textile factory for a time, and later at the National General Treasury.

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Wynn Bullock

Wynn Bullock began his photographic career at the age of 42 studying at the Art Center School in Los Angeles, California. A lifelong friend of Edward Weston, his work and influence thrived in Bullock's photographs and in 1968, he became a trustee and chairman of the exhibition committee during the formative years of Friends of Photography in Carmel, California. Bullock is recognized as an American master photographer of the 20th Century. His work is included in over 90 major museum collections around the world including The Museum of Modern Art, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Hallmark Collection of Photography and The Center for Creative Photography which holds the archives of Ansel Adams, Harry Callahan, Frederick Sommer and Aaron Siskind.

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Harry Callahan

Harry Callahan was an American photographer born in Detroit. Self-taught, he began taking pictures in 1938 as a hobby and, inspired by the work of Ansel Adams, began to produce professional-quality photographs in the 1940s. His mature work is said to mingle the precision of Americans like Adams with the experimentalism of Europeans like Lázló Moholy-Nagy. His black-and-white city streetscapes and rural landscapes combine the commonplace with the starkly abstract, exploring contrasts of sunlight and shadow, tone and texture, static buildings and hurried passersby, while his many lovingly distinctive portraits of his wife and daughter are extremely personal and intimate. He sometimes used multiple exposures, and experimented with color slide film in the 1940s, again making color images from 1977 on. An influential figure in modern photography, he taught at Chicago's Institute of Design (1946-61) and the Rhode Island School of Design (1961-77).

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Sparky Campanella

Sparky Campanella is a Los Angeles based self-taught photographer who switched careers in 2001 from software marketing to fine-art photography. His figurative works are typically conceptual and abstract, with a minimal aesthetic. Sparky grew up in Pittsburgh and has been photographing almost as long as he’s been walking. He has shown his work in group exhibitions nationally including Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock; Umbrella Arts, NYC; The Print Center, Philadelphia; Texas Photographic Arts, San Antonio; SF Camerawork, San Francisco; Gallery 825, Los Angeles; and Irvine Fine Arts Center, Irvine. He holds an undergraduate degree from Duke University and a graduate degree from Stanford University. He has been an instructor at the Harvey Milk Institute in San Francisco and at Prescott College in Arizona. He has been awarded residencies at the School of Visual Arts in New York City and Anderson Ranch in Colorado.

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Paul Caponigro

Paul Caponigro is one of America's most significant master photographers. Born in Boston in 1932, he began photographing as a youth at thirteen. He has subsequently sustained an artistic career spanning over forty years, which began in earnest in 1951 and involved studies with Minor White and Benjamen Chinn. Caponigro's first one-man show at the George Eastman house took place in 1958. Since that time he has been widely exhibited throughout the United States and Europe. Two Guggenheim Fellowships and three NEA grants have been awarded to Caponigro over the course of his photographic career in recognition of his singularly masterful and uncompromising artistry. His work forms a visual bridge between the material world of physical forms and the living spirit behind them.

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Henri Cartier-Bresson

Henri Cartier-Bresson was persuaded by Robert Capa to call himself a photojournalist rather than an artist or a Surrealist for his first New York show. Best known for his concept of the "decisive moment" in photography. At its best this leads to a dynamic image but easily becomes - even occasionally in the hands of the master himself - a formal stasis. Cartier-Bresson is the recipient of an extraordinary number of prizes, awards and honorary doctorates including the Overseas Press Club of America Award (1948, 1954, 1960, 1964), The A.S.M.P. Award (1953), the Prix de la Société Française de Photographie (1959), the Culture Prize, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Photographie (1975). Capa also persuaded Cartier-Bresson to become one of the founders of Magnum.

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Mark Citret

Mark Citret has always been intrigued by the everyday wonders of the visual world. The sense of expansive awareness that for Citret is a prerequisite to photography enables him to capture the small everyday flashes of insight that come when we are open to them and often go before we can fully grasp or appreciate them. Sights that most of us tend not to notice—a weathered phone book, an empty bulletin board, a twisted chain link fence—seem full of meaning, made spectacular and somehow poignant through his eye. Citret’s images are a sort of meditation in seeing; though they rarely contain human forms, they are powerful testaments to the relationship between human presence and transitory nature. Fascinated from his earliest work with the delicate nuances possible in black and white, his work with vellum paper allows him to convey the ideas of softer ranges in his work. Luminous and warm, the vellums heighten the sense of everyday epiphany found in his images.

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Group f/64

Group f/64 was a group founded by seven 20th-century San Francisco Bay Area photographers who shared a common photographic style characterized by sharply focused and carefully framed images seen through a particularly Western (U.S.) viewpoint. In part, they formed in opposition to the pictorial photographic style that had dominated much of the early 20th century, but moreover, they wanted to promote a new modernist aesthetic that was based on precisely exposed images of natural forms and found objects.

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Robb Johnson

Robb Johnson creates haunting and mysterious black and white photographs reminiscent of the chiaroscuro style of the old Italian masters. The unusual atmospheric conditions he finds by photographing in the dark of night imbue his photographs with mystery. He sets a stage where the actors seem to have just stepped off or have yet to arrive for some unknown drama. Johnson’s photographs evoke a world where the viewer is free to explore with his or her own emotions and awareness – a drama unbeknownst but to them. Robb was a scholarship student at Art Center College of Design and earned a BFA in Photography. He worked in advertising photography for over 20 years, specializing in creating visual environments for national hotels with his wife Dale. He decided to turn his visual focus inward and pursue his art for himself. His work has been featured in B&W Magazine, Spotlight and B&W Single Image for 2006, 2007 and 2008 and his book, Robb Johnson Photographs was published by The French Press in 2008.

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Pirkle Jones

Pirkle Jones lived in California from the mid-1940s on, photographing the state and its inhabitants with understanding and sympathy. In 1946, when Ansel Adams started the first-ever department of photography in an art school (at what is now the San Francisco Art Institute), Jones was one of the first students, and he returned later to teach classes of his own. Jones grew up in the rural Midwest on a family farm, and when he moved to California his great interests at first were the qualities of San Francisco itself: its moody fog, brilliant sun, tiny houses, and steep perspectives.

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Yousuf Karsh

Yousuf Karsh is the most renowned portrait photographer of our time. He has perceptively photographed the statesmen, artists, and literary and scientific figures that have shaped our lives in the 20th century. Known for his ability to transform “the human face into legend,” many of the portraits that he created have become virtually the image of the great man or woman they portray, whether Winston Churchill, Ernest Hemingway, Albert Einstein, Georgia O’Keeffe or Helen Keller. In other words, “to experience a Karsh photograph is to feel in the presence of history itself.” His photographs are in major private and public collections throughout the world, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston holding the largest collection in the United States.

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André Kertész

André Kertész is one of the most important photographers of the twentieth century. In a career that spanned more than seventy years, he made some of the most deceptively simple yet compelling photographs ever created. Working intuitively, he sought to capture the poetry of modern urban life, revealing its quiet incidents and odd, occasionally comic, even bizarre juxtapositions. Combining an amateur’s love for the personal and immediate with a modernist’s sense of form, he created a purely photographic idiom that celebrated a direct observation of everyday life. A major retrospective of his work is traveling this year from the National Portrait Gallery to the Los Angeles County Museum and on to the International Center of Photography.

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Bob Kolbrener

Bob Kolbrener's subjects, from landscapes to portraits, from symbols of man encroaching on nature to humorous signage, are all carefully and thoughtfully executed. A show with Brett Weston in Los Angeles over 35 years ago launched his work. Since then, it has been exhibited throughout the United States as well as in Austria, China, Indonesia and Japan. With photographs in numerous private and corporate collections, including Texaco, Polaroid, Southwestern Bell and A. G. Edwards, his images are also in collections at institutions such as the Saint Louis Art Museum, the Monterey Museum of Art, the High Museum of Art and Washington University. Kolbrener began conducting workshops with Ansel Adams at Yosemite. In the past four decades since, he has continued teaching at other workshop venues in addition to serving as a guest lecturer at a number of universities and museums.

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Paul Kozal

Paul Kozal is a self taught photographer, has been devoting his life to the exploration of fine art photography since 1989. Using black and white film he creates toned and hand-tinted gelatin-silver prints. Carefully masking significant portions of a print, Kozal selectively tones in selenium to render a rich purple-brown color or with sepia that produces a warmer tone. Often, he will apply both tones, in separate sections to the same photograph or hand-color with pencils and watercolors. Kozal also works in color printing Fuji Crystal Archive and Kodak Metallic prints. His subject matter consists mostly of landscapes of the Southwest and California.

His photographs have been selected for many prestigious national and international juried exhibitions and won many awards. He is represented in several galleries throughout the United States. His photographs are in numerous public and private collections including Tokyo Photographic Culture Center, Cantor Center for the Arts and the Monterey Museum of Fine Art.

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Clarence John Laughlin

Laughlin worked in New Orleans and found inspiration in the city’s faded grandeur. He developed what he termed as his own “visual poetry” by borrowing elements from modern photography—such as strong compositions and highly glossy printing techniques—and imbuing his images with mysterious symbolism. Here, Laughlin stages a tableau of enigmatic richness: a woman in black stands amid broken mirror shards and crumbling walls, holding a wood frame out of which stares the decapitated head of a sculpture. The blurred movement of the woman’s veil emphasizes the scene’s surreal, ghostly quality. ~ The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Gustave Le Gray

Gustave Le Gray has has been called the most important French photographer of the nineteenth century. Trained as a painter under Paul Delaroche, Le Gray made his mark in the emerging medium of photography. An experimenter and technical innovator, Le Gray pioneered the use of the paper negative in France and developed a waxed-paper negative that produced sharper-focus prints. In 1851 he began to use collodion on glass negatives, which further increased the clarity of his images. He became one of the first five photographers, along with Édouard-Denis Baldus and Hippolyte Bayard, to work for the missions héliographique, a government-sponsored commission to document the state of repair of important French monuments and buildings. He was also a founding member of the Société Héliographique, the first photographic organization in the world. In the early 1860s he toured the Mediterranean with Alexandre Dumas. He spent his last years in Lebanon and finally Egypt, where he became a professor of drawing and where he died, in 1884.

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Robert Mapplethorpe

Robert Mapplethorpe is known for his elegantly expressive black-and-white studies of male and female nudes, flowers, and celebrity portraits. He credited sculpture as an influence on his work and used traditional techniques of direct lighting and sharp focus to produce sleekly ravishing effects and gleaming surfaces. His photographs include homoerotic images, often glamorized and disturbing, which made him a controversial figure. Soon after his death from AIDS, the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C., canceled a traveling retrospective of his work in an unsuccessful attempt to avoid a debate in Congress over public funding by the National Endowment for the Arts of works deemed “objectionable” by fundamentalist religious groups and political conservatives.

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Charles Marville

Charles Marville was initially trained as a painter, engraver and illustrator before he became a landscape and architecture photographer. Many of his works were made in Italy, Germany and Algeria. He was commissioned to document some of the ancient architecture in Paris during the 1850's and was hired by the Musee du Louvre to make reproductions of artwork in the collection. Marville was made the official photographer in Paris in 1862.

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McDermott & McGough

McDermott & McGough consists of visual artists David McDermott and Peter McGough. They are contemporary artists known for their work in painting, photography, sculpture and film. They currently split their time between Dublin and New York City. McDermott & McGough are best known for using alternative historical processes in their photography, including the techniques of cyanotype, gum bichromate, salt, tri color carbo, platinum and palladium. Among the subjects they approach are popular art and culture, religion, medicine, advertising, time, fashion and sexual behavior.

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Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell was born in Havana, Cuba in 1948. He immigrated to the United States with his parents in 1962. Morell received his undergraduate degree from Bowdoin College and his MFA from The Yale University School of Art. He has received an honorary degree from Bowdoin College in 1997 and from Lesley University in 2014.His work has been collected and shown in many galleries, institutions and museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Art Museum in New York, The Chicago Art Institute, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Houston Museum of Art, The Boston Museum of Fine Art, The Victoria & Albert Museum and over seventy other museums in the United States and abroad. A retrospective of his work organized jointly by the Art Institute of Chicago, The Getty in Los Angeles and The High Museum in Atlanta closed in May 2014 after a year of travel.

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Wright Morris

Wright Morris was a renowned writer and effective photographer. Pairing photographs with his own writing, Morris pioneered a new tradition of “photo-texts” in the 1940s that proved highly influential to future photographers. Devoid of figures, his photographs depict everyday objects and atmosphere. Morris’s poetic images exist in a fictional narrative, but reference documentary style.

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Eadweard Muybridge

This important English photographer pioneered work in photographic studies of motion and in motion-picture projection. He emigrated to the United States as a young man but remained obscure until 1868, when his large photographs of Yosemite Valley, California, made him world famous. Muybridge's experiments in photographing motion began in 1872, when Leland Stanford hired him to prove that during a particular moment in a trotting horse's gait all four legs are off the ground simultaneously. His first efforts were unsuccessful because his camera lacked a fast shutter. The project was then interrupted while Muybridge was being tried for the murder of his wife's lover. Although he was acquitted, he found it expedient to travel for a number of years in Mexico and Central America, making publicity photographs for the Union Pacific Railroad, a company owned by Stanford.

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Yoshimitsu Nagasaka

Yoshimitsu Nagasaka was born in Wakayama, Japan. Since 1970, he has been photographing Mt. Koyasan, his birthplace, and pursues culture and religion as his subject. He has exhibited his works in many solo and group shows. He was honored with the art prize by the Society of Photographic Science and Technology of Japan in 2004, and for the artist prize by the Photographic Society of Japan in 2007. In 2015, he was also honored with the Regional Cultural Merits Award in Japan. He lives and works in Japan.

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William Neill

William Neill, a resident of the Yosemite National Park area since 1977, is a landscape photographer concerned with conveying the deep, spiritual beauty he sees and feels in Nature. Neill's award-winning photography has been widely published in books, magazines, calendars, posters, and his limited-edition prints have been collected and exhibited in museums and galleries nationally, including the Museum of Fine Art Boston, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, The Vernon Collection, and The Polaroid Collection. Neill received a BA degree in Environmental Conservation at the University of Colorado. In 1995, Neill received the Sierra Club's Ansel Adams Award for conservation photography.

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Manuello Paganelli

Manuello Paganelli grew up in Santo Domingo, Italy and Puerto Rico. After a mentorship with Ansel Adams, he worked as a photojournalist at the Chattanooga Times. In 1989, he began to explore Cuba, its land, its people, and its complex relationship with the USA. In 1995, he had his first solo photo show of his work on Cuba and that same year earned him a fellowship grant. The Washington Post wrote "Manuello Paganelli's Cuban photographs are a brilliant window on a land and people too long hidden from North American eyes. Working in the tradition of Cartier-Bresson and Robert Frank, Paganelli brings an artist's eyes and a native son's sensibility to his superb photographs."

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Irving Penn

Penn, the brother of the motion-picture director Arthur Penn, initially intended to become a painter, but at age 26 he took a job designing photographic covers for the fashion magazine Vogue. He began photographing his own ideas for covers and soon established himself as a fashion photographer. In 1950 he married model Lisa Fonssagrives, whom he photographed for much of his best work.

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Edward Steichen

Edward Steichen is one of the most influential figures in 20th century photography, as well as the history of photography from its inception on. By his early twenties, Steichen was winning the praise of Alfred Stieglitz in New York as well as Auguste Rodin in Paris, both of whom went on to become close friends, for his brooding tonalist landscapes and brilliant psychological studies. The preferred portraitist of both the American and the European elite during his earlier career, and an acknowledged master of the Pictorialist style, Steichen denounced Pictorialism following WWI in favor of “straight” photography. He is also known for his fashion and advertising photography. Curator of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City for over fifteen years, he was responsible for many important exhibitions, including The Family of Man.

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Carleton Watkins

Carleton Watkins’ position as a preeminent photographer of the American West is undisputed. He is considered by many to be the greatest American photographer of the nineteenth century. During his career of some fifty years, Watkins traveled the western US, making thousands of remarkable, historically important images. From breathtaking pictures of Yosemite, the Pacific Coast, and the scenery along the Columbia River, to the vast Sierra Nevada, these images provide an unparalleled visual record of the West. Watkin’s artistic vision was both refined and evocative. It is in large part due to the persuasive power of Watkin’s mammoth plate images of Yosemite that the area was set aside as a National Park.

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Robert Weingarten

Born in New York City in 1941, Robert Weingarten moved to Los Angeles in the early 1980s. His photographs have been exhibited widely, and are included in numerous collections, including the George Eastman House, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Polin Museum of Art, Warsaw, Poland and Whitney Museum of American Art. He has received numerous awards in photography as well as held many solo and group exhibitions worldwide. He has produced a number of books and has appeared in multiple publications. Robert Weingarten currently lives in Malibu, California.

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Jack Welpott

Internationally known photographer and educator, Jack Welpott was born in Kansas City, Kansas on April 27, 1923, but grew up in Bloomington, Indiana. After high school he enrolled in Indiana University, but was drafted into the U.S. Army Air Force in 1943. He served in the South Pacific as a radio intercept operator until 1946. After WW II, he returned to Indiana University on the G.I. Bill where he earned an M.F.A degree studying with Henry Holmes Smith. Jack and Jerry Uelsmann were the first M.F.A. graduates while Van Deren Coke was also a graduate student. During these years, he became acquainted with Harry Callahan, Aaron Siskind, and Minor White all of whom were established photographers and pioneers in American photographic education.

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Brett Weston

Brett Weston may be said to be the first successful artistic heir in the history of photography. The son of Edward Weston, Brett was taught the basics of photography by his father at the young age of fourteen, and set out on his own from that point on. At sixteen he had his first one-man show, and received international recognition at eighteen when a score of his photographs were displayed in the legendary “Film und Foto” exhibition of 1929 in Stuttgart. By the age of twenty, his photographs were on view in major shows in the US, Europe, and Japan. Since then, Weston’s photographs have been featured in hundreds of exhibitions around the world, and are staples in the collections of leading museums and galleries including the Getty Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Art Institute of Chicago, George Eastman House, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Amon Carter Museum, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, National Gallery of Art and the Smithsonian American Art Museum among others. Concerned with the elemental mass of forms, he is known for his great abstractions; he is also generally acknowledged as one of the finest printers in the medium.

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Cole Weston

Cole Weston first began working in color in 1947, when Eastman Kodak sent a quantity of their new film, Kodachrome, to his father, Edward Weston. He gave up black-and-white photography in his own personal endeavors almost immediately, and soon became one of photography’s finest colorists. His images are known for their unusual beauty, emotional impact, and exuberant use of color. Having simultaneously done his own creative work while printing from his father’s negatives, according to Edward’s wishes, for over thirty years, Cole turned his energies predominantly toward making his own photography in 1988, working across the American West, in Europe, and with the female nude. His work has been featured in more than sixty exhibitions worldwide and is in the collections of museums throughout the US and Europe.

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Edward Weston

Edward Weston, an American photographer was born in Highland Park, Illinois. Weston began to make photographs in Chicago parks in 1902, and his works were first exhibited in 1903 at the Art Institute of Chicago. Three years later he moved to California and opened a portrait studio in a Los Angeles suburb. The Western landscape soon became his principal subject matter. In the 1930s, Weston and several other photographers, including Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, and Willard van Dyke, formed the f/64 group, which greatly influenced the aesthetics of American photography. In 1937, Weston received the first Guggenheim Fellowship awarded to a photographer, which freed him from earning a living as a portraitist. The works for which he is famous–sharp, stark, brilliantly printed images of sand dunes, nudes, vegetables, rock formations, trees, cacti, shells, water, and human faces are among the finest of 20th-century photographs; their influence on modern art remains inestimable.

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Minor White

Minor White was an American photographer, theoretician, critic and educator. He combined an intense interest in how people viewed and understood photographs with a personal vision that was guided by a variety of spiritual and intellectual philosophies. Starting in Oregon in 1937 and continuing until he died in 1976, White made thousands of black-and-white and color photographs of landscapes, people and abstract subject matter, created with both technical mastery and a strong visual sense of light and shadow. He taught many classes, workshops and retreats on photography at the California School of Fine Arts, Rochester Institute of Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, other schools, and in his own home. He lived much of his life as a closeted gay man, afraid to express himself publicly for fear of loss of his teaching jobs, and some of his most compelling images are figure studies of men whom he taught or with whom he had relationships. He helped start and for many years was editor of the photography magazine Aperture. After his death in 1976, White was hailed as one of America's greatest photographers.

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Max Yavno

Social documentary photographer Max Yavno (1911-1985) identified the odd charm that constitutes the identity of a place and people. Born in New York, Yavno was a social worker from 1932-1936; this background clearly informed his photographic career. His humanistic sensibility is revealed in his work, which includes street photographs made in New York, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. Yavno is best known for his depictions of these great American cities and the cultural and social detail of their inhabitants, many of which distinctively reflect their era.

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